Bruce Bordett: The place I wanted to be

From Bruce Bordett

Sometime my senior year in college I decided that WGBH was the place I wanted to be. I started in the mailroom in 1971 and made it onto the crew about a year later. This I learned later was the time-honored path for many who had gone before me to find job happiness at the foundation. In truth, it was a great place to start… as I soon learned just who was who, where they sat, and what they did.

I loved working on the crew from day one. ‘GBH was such a great place to be in the ’70’s. Every day we worked on a different show. One day I was learning about strawberries from Jim Crockett, the next day speaking ubbie dubbie with the Zoomers. I learned about Itallian food from Franco and Margaret, and Ludvig B from Lenny Bernstein. Where in the world could you be surrounded by so much cool stuff and have the opportunity to meet so many wonderful characters? Read more...

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WGBH Timeline (1946-1978)

From “The first 24 years: A somewhat random compendium of milestones along the way”

1836

John Lowell Jr., leaves a bequest creating free “public lectures for the benefit of the citizens of Boston.” Read more...

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A Fond Farewell to Helen Fox

From QuickNooz (with permission)

Former ’GBHer Helen Fox passed away on Tues, 7/22. Helen worked at ’GBH during the Foundation’s early days. She started as a volunteer, and she stayed for 17 years, working in Fundraising and in ZOOM.

In an interview in the WGBH Archives (conducted by Fred Barzyk as part of an oral history project), the late David Ives credits Helen with showing him the fundraising ropes; apparently, Helen was known as WGBH’s human computer.

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NOVA: From the beginning (1970s)

This entry is part 1 of 11 in the series The Michael Ambrosino Collection

From Ben Shedd

I’m part of the group from the 1970s at ‘GBH, when NOVA was in some ways almost a separate unit at the station. It’s wonderful to learn about the history of WGBH and see why such grand programming has come from the people who worked there through the decades. I’m glad to be part of the great mix of talent who have worked at WGBH.

Michael Ambrosino called 27 years ago from WGBH looking for science filmmakers for a new unnamed science series he was starting. I had just finished my USC Film School Master’s thesis film project, an educational science film titled Mars Minus Myth with Planetary Geologist Professor Bruce Murray from the California Institute of Technology. Michael had gotten my name from the Public Affairs office at Cal Tech. Read more...

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