A stranger in a strange land

This entry is part 6 of 22 in the series The Fred Barzyk Collection

From Fred Barzyk: Bill insisted I try to get into the scholarship program. You studied for your graduate degree at Boston University and worked three days a week at the Educational Television station. Free tuition and you got $600 to live a year in Boston!

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Jeanie Angier, director of national promotion

Deepest condolences to the family, friends, and colleagues of former ’GBHer Jeanie Angier, who passed away May 8. Jeanie worked at WGBH from 1978 to 1993, eventually holding the position of Director of National Promotion. She started out at WGBH as a publicist for NOVA, and it was during that time that she met her husband, then fellow ’GBHer John Angier. Read more...

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Cherry Enoki, video editor, dies in climbing accident

From Cynthia Broner

The WGBH community was saddened to learn of the passing of Cherry Enoki, former ‘GBHer and editor on many projects, including Postcards from Buster, Fetch! with Ruff Ruffman, Design Squad and Nova ScienceNow.

Cherry died Fri, 11/28 while climbing Mount Shasta in Northern California. Read more...

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Still connected over the years

From Steve Rabin — 10/18/2008

I am not really a WGBH alum, although I spent many days during four years at the station working as Director of Programming at EEN with a number of the producer/directors on programming for the EEN member stations.

Beyond that, as Media Program Director for NEH from 1974-1982 I was privileged to help provide funding for such WGBH series as The Scarlet Letter, produced and directed by Rick Hauser (who with Nancy are in Minneapolis), Elsa’s Labor Series, and ran the program that provided the first $1 million for Vietnam: A Television History. Read more...

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WGBH Pioneers: Michael Ambrosino – Part 1 (1998)

This entry is part 3 of 11 in the series The Michael Ambrosino Collection

Michael Ambrosino — the creator of NOVA — describes his early years at WGBH, an era of live and live-on-tape TV productions at the 84 Massachusetts Avenue studio in Cambridge.

This series presents authorized interviews with early producers and directors for Boston’s innovative public television and radio stations. He was interviewed on June 19, 1998 by Fred Barzyk. Read more...

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WGBH Pioneers: Michael Ambrosino – Part 2 (1998)

This entry is part 4 of 11 in the series The Michael Ambrosino Collection

Michael Ambrosino — the creator of NOVA — describes his early years at WGBH, an era of live and live-on-tape TV productions at the 84 Massachusetts Avenue studio in Cambridge.

Watch Video — Part 2 (57 minutes)

Transcript — Part 2

INTERVIEWER: June 18, 1998, the second hour of a conversion with Michael Ambrosino. Read more...

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Advocating for The Advocates … and more

From Susan Kubany

I came to WGBH in 1972 to save Roger Fischer’s The Advocates series.  I was in love: Alan Dershowitz was the liberal advocate, William Rusher the conservative, and Michael Dukakis, the moderator. The debated topics were important, engaging and the drama, unique. (No liberal bias here. This was television at its finest.) I fought tenaciously for critic previews of upcoming shows to increase the audience.

Station manager Michael Rice mused nonchalantly in a meeting that we needed some good promos. “Get Muhammad Ali, Joe Namath, and Howard Cosell to do promos. You know, like, well, “The PBS Fight of the Week…”   No one believed I could do it. Read more...

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WGBH Timeline (1946-1978)

From “The first 24 years: A somewhat random compendium of milestones along the way”

1836

John Lowell Jr., leaves a bequest creating free “public lectures for the benefit of the citizens of Boston.” Read more...

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NOVA: From the beginning (1970s)

This entry is part 1 of 11 in the series The Michael Ambrosino Collection

From Ben Shedd

I’m part of the group from the 1970s at ‘GBH, when NOVA was in some ways almost a separate unit at the station. It’s wonderful to learn about the history of WGBH and see why such grand programming has come from the people who worked there through the decades. I’m glad to be part of the great mix of talent who have worked at WGBH.

Michael Ambrosino called 27 years ago from WGBH looking for science filmmakers for a new unnamed science series he was starting. I had just finished my USC Film School Master’s thesis film project, an educational science film titled Mars Minus Myth with Planetary Geologist Professor Bruce Murray from the California Institute of Technology. Michael had gotten my name from the Public Affairs office at Cal Tech. Read more...

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